A Macro for Commonly Confused Words

  By C.K. MacLeod Updated July 30, 2015 Thanks to Eliza Dee for suggesting a tweak that makes this macro even better (see the comments below for details)! The macro script has been updated. Adverse or averse? Assent or ascent? English contains many words that are easily confused—words that sound the same, but have different meanings and… Continue reading A Macro for Commonly Confused Words

Make Your Writing Readable with the Plain Language Macro

by C.K. MacLeod Updated March 14, 2019. Do you write or edit nonfiction? If you do, you need to know that readers are time pressed. One way to make the reading experience more accessible to readers is to find ten-dollar words in your writing and swap them out with simpler words that most readers will… Continue reading Make Your Writing Readable with the Plain Language Macro

How to Ease Repetitive Strain Injury

By C.K. MacLeod Are you participating in NaNoWriMo? Is your wrist starting to ache and your fingers starting to tingle? If so, you could be experiencing early signs of repetitive strain injury. You’re not alone. I’ve gotten away with the same computer practices I’ve used for years, without a bodily complaint. Until now. Thankfully, it’s… Continue reading How to Ease Repetitive Strain Injury

Showing vs. Telling Macro

by @CKMacLeod Most writers are familiar with the adage, show, don’t tell. But sometimes it’s tricky to determine when those telling instances have crept into your writing. Editor Janice Hardy of Fiction University explains how telling happens and offers advice for how to turn telling into showing. She and Valerie Comer of To Write a… Continue reading Showing vs. Telling Macro

Hunt Down Adverbs with a Macro

by C.K. MacLeod …the road to hell is paved with adverbs and I will shout it from the rooftops. ~Steven King Do you use -ly words in your writing? Do you use them with the dialogue tags he said and she said? Example: “Who do you think you are?” she said arrogantly. According to author Steven… Continue reading Hunt Down Adverbs with a Macro

Find Passive Words in Your Writing

Passive words can make your writing dull. Use this macro to find passive words so you can replace them with strong, active words. Word will highlight passive words in bright green. Copy the macro from Sub to End Sub and paste it into Microsoft Word’s Visual Basic Application (VBA). This free 20-minute macro course will show… Continue reading Find Passive Words in Your Writing